VA Home Inspections

Frequently Asked Questions

Who should have a home inspection?
What is included in a home inspection?
What is radon? Why should I test for it?
What is mold? Why should I test for it?
Are you insured?
Should I use an architect or engineer to inspect my home?
Do you get on every roof?
When will I get my report?


Who should have a home inspection?

Anyone buying a home, whether for a principal place of residence or as an investment, should have it inspected prior to purchase. Most sellers would benefit from having their home inspected before it is listed to identify any major defects that could affect the value of the house. Remember, the true cost of a house is the purchase price plus the costs for upgrading substandard, deteriorated or malfunctioning components.

What is included in a home inspection?
A home inspection is a non-invasive visual examination of a residential dwelling. The purpose of a home inspection is to identify observed material defects within specific components, including any mechanical, structural, electrical, plumbing or other essential systems or portions of the home. 

What is radon? Why should I test for it?
Radon is a cancer-causing, radioactive gas that you are not able to see, smell or taste. By breathing in air containing radon, you increase your chances of getting lung cancer. The good news is that your home inspector from Inspecx can test radon levels, and a house with high radon levels (4 pCi/L or higher) can be fixed.

The EPA provides extensive information on radon, its risks and solutions for homes with high radon levels.

What is mold? Why should I test for it?
Molds are fungi that can be found both indoors and outdoors everywhere. Molds have the potential to cause health problems. Molds produce allergens, irritants, and in some cases, potentially toxic substances. Inhaling or touching mold or mold spores may cause allergic reactions in sensitive individuals.

Inspecx assists clients with evaluating moisture and mold issues. We can perform surface sampling where there are visible suspect growths. Air sampling is recommended if there is evidence of prior water damage but suspicion of possible hidden mold growth.

Are you insured?

Inspecx Home Inspections is fully insured for errors and omissions as well as for general liability in excess of Virginia state requirements for home inspectors.

Should I use an architect or engineer to inspect my home?
An architect or engineer, while having a specific advanced degree, may be no more qualified to perform a home inspection than any other home inspector. To inspect homes, the architect or engineer has had to undergo the same training and pass the same exams as any other inspector. A degree in electrical engineering may be ideal for inspecting electrical systems, but what about the structure or the plumbing or other systems? Home inspectors need to have general knowledge about all systems within a house.

Do you get on every roof?
No. Home inspectors have to protect their own safety. Some roofs just are not safe for an inspector to walk on (walking on roofs that are in bad condition also poses a risk of further damage as well). However, the condition of the roof can typically be just as easily evaluated by looking at other areas of the house as well. Leaks in the ceiling or attic are also clear indicators that our inspectors always look for.

When will I get my report?
Inspecx will send you a link to your electronic report within 24 hours of the completion your home inspection. Some inspectors provide check-list inspection reports on-site; however, Inspecx prefers to incorporate photos to better illustrate identified issues. Also, this gives us the opportunity to cite references to help support you if you are requesting repairs or a concession from the seller.

            Call Tim Gardner at 540-798-1388

or email us at inspecx@inspecx.com
for more Information
VA Lic # 3380000992